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The Latest at Baker Tilly Toronto

  • Cryptocurrency in Canada in 2020

    Bitcoin, the very first cryptocurrency, was created in 2009. Ten years and many thousands of cryptocurrencies later, taxation and regulatory agencies around the world are finally starting to realize that cryptocurrencies are here to stay.

    Baker Tilly

    Baker Tilly WM announces two new partners

    Vancouver, BC – Baker Tilly WM is pleased to announce Mary Louise Hall and Joel Babich have been promoted to partner. Charting similar paths at the firm, they both arrived in 2018. Since then, Hall served as director, Professional Standards, Audit & Accounting in the Toronto office, while Babich served as director, Professional Standards in the Vancouver office.

  • Baker Tilly

    Meet our people in Toronto

    Our experts are at the heart of the exceptional service we provide. Our team has now grown extensively, allowing us to offer clients even greater audit, tax and specialty advisory support. From traditional accounting and assurance services to tax, corporate finance and business consulting, we’ve got you covered.

    Let's connect.

  • Baker Tilly WM announces two new partners

    Vancouver, BC – Baker Tilly WM is pleased to announce Mary Louise Hall and Joel Babich have been promoted to partner. Charting similar paths at the firm, they both arrived in 2018. Since then, Hall served as director, Professional Standards, Audit & Accounting in the Toronto office, while Babich served as director, Professional Standards in the Vancouver office.

    Baker Tilly

    The capital gains inclusion rate dilemma

    As we get closer to the federal budget date each year, people start speculating about a possible increase in the capital gains inclusion rate. Currently, individuals only pay tax on 50 per cent of their capital gains, leaving the other 50 per cent tax-free. There are legitimate policy reasons for not taxing 100 per cent of capital gains (e.g., inflation, risk), but the intention of this article is not to debate the policy behind full or partial taxation on capital gains.